The Ultimate Site for College Football Stats Junkies

Split Statistics

All stat categories broken down by game location, game result, playing surface, opponent, and month. Split statistics are provided by team and player.

Situational Statistics

Rushing, passing, and receiving broken down by half, quarter, down and distance, field position, and score. Situational statistics are provided by team and player.

Leader Boards

Sortable national and conference leaders for teams and players, for all games and by split statistics.

Starting a Drive on the Doorstep

November 6th, 2008

In California’s 26-16 win over Oregon, two of Cal’s touchdowns were set up by turnovers that started the drives inside Oregon’s ten yard line. Given the rainy weather conditions, having such short touchdown drives was key to the Bears’ victory.

In Florida’s 49-10 rout of Georgia, one of Florida’s 3rd-quarter drives that helped blow the game open started at Georgia’s one yard line, and another started at Georgia’s ten yard line. Both drives were set up by Georgia turnovers.

So far this season, eleven teams have started two drives inside the opponent’s ten yard line during a game, and they are 10-1 in those games. On drives that start from the opponent’s ten yard line to the one yard line, teams score a touchdown 81.8% of the time, and kick a field goal 10.7% of the time.

A breakdown of drive outcomes in 2008 based on the starting field position of the drive:

Drive Start (Yard Line) #Drives TD% FG% Punt% Missed FG% TO% Other%
Own 1 to 9 895 12.1 3.9 53.3 2.2 13.2 15.3
Own 10 to 19 1812 15.9 6.0 48.6 2.4 14.4 12.7
Own 20 to 29 4997 19.4 6.2 46.7 2.4 15.0 10.2
Own 30 to 39 2677 24.9 8.4 36.9 4.3 14.3 11.3
Own 40 to 49 1602 31.7 9.7 29.8 5.1 11.4 12.4
50 to Opp. 41 831 32.3 14.7 22.4 5.5 11.2 14.0
Opp. 40 to 31 499 39.3 16.4 8.8 9.0 10.2 16.2
Opp. 30 to 21 404 42.8 27.7 2.2 9.2 8.2 9.9
Opp. 20 to 11 228 56.1 21.9 0.4 4.8 8.3 8.3
Opp. 10 to 1 121 81.8 10.7 0.0 0.8 2.5 4.1
               
All Drives 14066 24.2 8.6 38.3 3.7 13.5 11.7

The TO% column includes turnovers: interceptions and fumbles lost. The Other% column includes drives that ended on downs, by safety, and by the end of the half.

The New Clock Rules – Week 10

November 6th, 2008

This week’s look at the impact of the new 40-second clock rule is available at The Wiz Of Odds.

Be sure to check out more work by The Wiz, Jay Christensen, over at Fan Nation.

Rivals.com – Inside the numbers: Big offense, big defense

November 5th, 2008

Mike Huguenin of Rivals.com has posted his latest Inside the Numbers column.

Interceptions Returned for Touchdown

November 3rd, 2008

Jarrett Lee of LSU threw an interception last Saturday that was returned for a touchdown by Tulane’s Travis Burks. That makes three Lee interceptions returned for touchdown in the last two weeks. Georgia’s Darryl Gamble returned two of Lee’s passes for touchdown the previous week.

In eight games this season, Lee has thrown ten interceptions and five of them have been returned for a touchdown, which leads the nation. Four quarterbacks are tied for second this season with three interceptions returned for touchdown.

Players with the most total interceptions returned for touchdown since 2005 (* denotes active players):

Player Team Pass Att. Pass Int. Ret. for TD
Leon Jackson III Utah State 610 17 7
*Rudy Carpenter Arizona State 1196 33 6
*Jarrett Lee LSU 189 10 5
*Nathan Enderle Idaho 580 30 5
Clint Marks Middle Tennessee 581 16 5
*Karsten Sween Wyoming 640 31 5
Sam Hollenbach Maryland 643 26 5
*Justin Willis SMU 684 24 5
*Giovanni Vizza North Texas 775 31 5
Martin Hankins Memphis 805 25 5
*Colt McCoy Texas 1018 30 5
Bret Meyer Iowa State 1125 35 5
Matt Ryan Boston College 1275 34 5
*Chase Holbrook New Mexico State 1393 38 5
*Graham Harrell Texas Tech 1798 30 5

Lee has some good company on this list, including Heisman contenders Colt McCoy and Graham Harrell, and first-round NFL draft pick Matt Ryan. But those three players each have over 1000 pass attempts during this timeframe while Lee has only 189. In fact, the player on the list with the 2nd-fewest pass attempts (Enderle – 580) has over three times as many attempts as Lee. Senior Rudy Carpenter of Arizona State is the active FBS leader with six interceptions returned for touchdown.

200-Yard Rushing Games by QBs

November 3rd, 2008

When Mike Kafka of Northwestern rushed for 217 yards in the Wildcats’ 24-17 win against Minnesota, he became the fourth quarterback this season to rush for 200 yards in a game. That’s the most 200-yard rushing games by quarterbacks in a season since there were four in 2005, and that’s more than the 2006 and 2007 seasons combined (two).

The eleven 200-yard rushing games by a quarterback since 2004:

Quarterback Team Date Rush Yards Pass Yards
Vince Young Texas 10/29/2005 267 239
Pat White West Virginia 10/14/2006 247 99
Brad Smith Missouri 10/22/2005 246 234
Colin Kaepernick Nevada 09/27/2008 240 176
Ricky Dobbs Navy 10/25/2008 224 0
Joshua Cribbs Kent State 10/30/2004 223 150
Pat White West Virginia 11/16/2006 220 204
Pat White West Virginia 11/24/2005 220 41
Robert Griffin Baylor 09/12/2008 217 129
Mike Kafka Northwestern 11/01/2008 217 143
Vince Young Texas 01/04/2006 200 267

Pat White of West Virginia has had three 200-yard rushing games in his career, but none since 2006. Vince Young of Texas had two 200-yard rushing games in 2005, including the BCS championship game against USC on January 4, 2006. White, Young, and Brad Smith of Missouri are three of only eight players in FBS/D1-A history to both rush for 200 yards and pass for 200 yards in a game.

Week 10 Statistics Available

November 3rd, 2008

The statistics through week 10 of the 2008 season (through 11/01/2008) are now available.

Checking Meyer's Number

October 30th, 2008

In the Kentucky-Florida game last Saturday, Florida blocked two punts and a field goal. After the first blocked punt was converted into a touchdown by Florida, Raycom play-by-play announcer Dave Neal said “Urban Meyer has said a team that blocks a kick during a game wins ninety-percent of the time.” An article this week by David Jones in the Fort Myers News-Press attributed the same claim to Meyer.

I decided to check the data to see if it supports Meyer’s claim. It’s not necessarily that I didn’t believe him; I really had no pre-conceived idea of what the percentage might be. Besides, Meyer and his staff have been pretty accurate in the past when they have given the results of their research to the media.

For this purpose, I’m going look at all games involving FBS teams from the 2005 season through the current season. Since the term “kick” is fairly vague and could include punts, field goals, PAT kicks, or any combination of the three, I’m going to break it down by each blocked kick type.

Here are the win/loss numbers for the team that blocks a kick during a game:

Team That Blocks... G Wins Losses Win %
A Punt 449 295 154 65.70%
A Field Goal 350 199 151 56.86%
A PAT Kick 228 91 137 39.91%
Any Type of Kick 971 556 415 57.26%

No matter which way a “kick” is defined, these win percentages are nowhere close to 90%. I was really surprised by the low win percentage in games that a team blocks a PAT kick — not sure of the reason for that.

It’s unknown what set of games that Meyer used to come up with his 90% number. It’s possible that he may have only been looking at games involving teams he coached during his career. Under Meyer, Florida is 15-1 (93.75%) in games that they’ve blocked a punt, field goal or PAT kick.

UPDATE: Readers Galen and Ryan pointed out that the likely reason that teams have a losing record in games that they blocked a PAT kick is because teams that lose games generally give up more touchdowns, and therefore have more opportunities to block PAT kicks.

The New Clock Rules – Week 9

October 30th, 2008

This week’s look at the impact of the new 40-second clock rule is available at The Wiz Of Odds.

Be sure to check out more work by The Wiz, Jay Christensen, over at Fan Nation.

Rivals.com: Inside the numbers – making third down look easy

October 30th, 2008

Mike Huguenin of Rivals.com has posted his latest Inside the Numbers column.

Forgotten Penalties

October 29th, 2008

Every college football box score has a line that includes the number of penalties in the game for each team. Here at cfbstats.com, there is a leader board that ranks the FBS teams on the total number of penalties for the season.

The number of penalties in the box scores and the rankings do not reflect the number of penalties actually called, only the number of penalties that are accepted. However, when it comes to assessing a team’s tendency to be called for penalties, the declined and offset penalties should count just as much as the accepted penalties. Other than personal foul penalties and the like, whether a penalty is accepted or not is usually determined by the game situation (down, distance, score, field position, time left in the half, etc.) rather than the penalty itself.

In 510 games so far this season, 6818 penalties have been called, of which 6165 (90.4%) have been accepted and 653 (9.6%) have been declined or offset. Almost 10% of called penalties are declined or offset, and become forgotten penalties as far as the official statistics are concerned.

The FBS teams with the most forgotten penalties this season:

Team Total Accepted Forgotten Forgotten %
Arkansas 70 58 12 17.14%
Eastern Michigan 59 47 12 20.34%
Temple 73 62 11 15.07%
Minnesota 61 50 11 18.03%
Kentucky 53 42 11 20.75%
Marshall 44 33 11 25.00%
Florida Atlantic 71 61 10 14.08%
Army 38 28 10 26.32%
Louisiana-Monroe 68 59 9 13.24%
Auburn 63 54 9 14.29%
North Carolina State 57 49 8 14.04%
Middle Tennessee 57 49 8 14.04%
LSU 52 44 8 15.38%
Georgia Tech 52 44 8 15.38%
Kent State 48 40 8 16.67%
Alabama 45 37 8 17.78%
Buffalo 41 33 8 19.51%

On the other end, Indiana, UCLA, and Michigan have no forgotten penalties — every penalty against them this season has been accepted.

The FBS teams with the highest percentage of forgotten penalties:

Team Total Accepted Forgotten Forgotten %
Army 38 28 10 26.32%
Marshall 44 33 11 25.00%
Ball State 33 26 7 21.21%
Kentucky 53 42 11 20.75%
Eastern Michigan 59 47 12 20.34%
Buffalo 41 33 8 19.51%
Minnesota 61 50 11 18.03%
Alabama 45 37 8 17.78%
Arkansas 70 58 12 17.14%
Wake Forest 35 29 6 17.14%
Kent State 48 40 8 16.67%
Vanderbilt 38 32 6 15.79%
LSU 52 44 8 15.38%
Georgia Tech 52 44 8 15.38%
Temple 73 62 11 15.07%

Finally, the FBS teams with the highest number of total penalties (accepted plus forgotten):

Team Total Accepted Forgotten Forgotten % Total Rank Accepted Rank
TCU 88 83 5 5.68% 1 1
Georgia 80 76 4 5.00% 2 2
Hawaii 76 69 7 9.21% 3 3
South Florida 75 69 6 8.00% 4 3
Temple 73 62 11 15.07% 5 11
Florida Atlantic 71 61 10 14.08% 6 13
Arkansas 70 58 12 17.14% 7 18
Florida State 70 63 7 10.00% 7 9
Southern Miss. 70 64 6 8.57% 7 7
Washington State 70 65 5 7.14% 7 6
Louisiana-Monroe 68 59 9 13.24% 11 17
Nebraska 68 64 4 5.88% 11 7
Texas Tech 68 66 2 2.94% 11 5
Stanford 67 60 7 10.45% 14 15
Utah State 65 61 4 6.15% 15 13
BYU 65 62 3 4.62% 15 11
Oklahoma State 65 63 2 3.08% 15 9
USC 64 57 7 10.94% 18 23
New Mexico 64 60 4 6.25% 18 15
Auburn 63 54 9 14.29% 20 29
Florida 63 57 6 9.52% 20 23
Ohio 63 58 5 7.94% 20 18

The last two columns show the rankings when sorted by total penalties (Total Rank) and the rankings when sorted by accepted penalties (Accepted Rank). Moving into the top 10 are Temple that goes from 11th in accepted penalties to 5th in total penalties, Florida Atlantic that goes from 13th to 6th, and Arkansas that goes from 18th to 7th. Kentucky is the biggest gainer overall, going up 27 spots from 83rd to 55th.

Moving out of the top 10 are Texas Tech that goes from 5th to 11th, Nebraska that goes from 7th to 11th, and Oklahoma State that goes from 9th to 15th. UCLA and Indiana dropped the most overall, both going down 21 spots from 60th to 81st.

The complete list can be downloaded here.